Making traditional Polish pierogi (dumplings) from scratch is a labour of love, but they taste infinitely better than store-bought.
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Traditional Polish Pierogi

Making traditional Polish pierogi (dumplings) from scratch is a labour of love, but they taste infinitely better than store-bought. This recipe makes a big batch of pierogi – you can freeze any leftovers.
Ideally make the fillings before you make the dough to allow them to cool completely.
Prep Time1 hr 30 mins
Cook Time5 mins
Total Time1 hr 35 mins
Course: Appetizer, Main Course
Cuisine: Polish
Keyword: Pierogi, Polish Pierogi
Servings: 40 -45
Author: Lucy Parissi | Supergolden Bakes

Ingredients

  • For the dough
  • 500 g | 1lb 2oz | 4 cups all purpose flour or 00 flour
  • plus more for dusting
  • 1 large egg lightly beaten
  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 250 ml | 1 cup lukewarm water + more if needed
  • butter or vegetable oil to fry

Cream and mushroom filling

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 1 small onion very finely diced
  • 500 g | 1lb 2oz chestnut crimini mushrooms, finely chopped
  • 2 tbsp dried porcini mushrooms
  • 150 ml | 2/3 cup double heavy cream
  • 2 tsp lemon juice
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • salt and pepper to season

Beef and bacon filling

  • 1 tbsp vegetable oil
  • 1 tsp butter
  • 4 strips streaky bacon or smoked pancetta finely diced
  • 1 large onion very finely diced
  • 500 g | 1lb 2oz minced beef not lean
  • 120 ml | 1/2 cup double heavy cream
  • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley
  • 1 tbsp chopped fresh dill
  • salt and pepper to season

To serve

  • 4 strips streaky bacon or smoked pancetta
  • 1 large onion finely diced
  • sour cream to serve
  • fresh dill or parsley to garnish

Instructions

  • Ideally make the fillings before you make the dough to allow them to cool completely.
  • Mushroom filling: put the dried mushrooms in a measuring jug and cover with boiling water. Set aside to rehydrate while you get on with the recipe. Chop them very finely after 10 minutes.
  • Heat the butter and oil in a frying pan and fry the onion over low heat for 10 minutes.
  • Add the mushrooms and fry for 5 minutes.
  • Add the lemon juice and season well with salt and pepper. Cook until the mushrooms are soft and pan is nearly dry.
  • Stir in the cream and cook for a couple of minutes then add the parsley. Make sure you taste and adjust the seasoning at this stage.
  • Leave to cool completely, then chill for a few hours or overnight, in the fridge.
  • Roll the filling into little stuffing balls, using 1 level tbsp for each.
  • Beef and bacon filling: heat the oil and butter in a frying pan and add the bacon. Stir until it starts to render some of its fat.
  • Add the onion and cook over low heat for 10 minutes until soft.
  • Add the mince and break it up with the back of a spoon. Cook until nicely browned.
  • Add the cream and cook until the pan is nearly dry. Leave to cool slightly, taste and adjust the seasoning if needed.
  • Transfer to a food processor and pulse until finely ground (but don't turn to a paste).
  • Stir in the herbs, leave to cool completely, then chill for a few hours, or overnight, in the fridge.
  • Roll the filling into little stuffing balls, using 1 level tbsp for each.

Pierogi Dough

  • Make the dough. Sift the flour into a large bowl. Make a well in the centre and add the beaten egg, oil and a few tablespoons of the water.
  • Stir together using a wooden spoon and continue adding the water until the dough comes together.
  • Tip onto a floured worktop and kneap for 5 minutes until it starts becoming elastic. If the dough is too dry then add a little more water, a tablespoon at a time.
  • Cover with a damp tea towel and rest for 30 minutes.
  • Dust your worktop with flour. Divide the dough in half (or more pieces) as it is easier to roll out this way. Keep any unused dough covered with a damp tea towel and have a large floured tray on standby.
  • Roll out your dough until about 3mm (1/8in) think, turning and pulling at the edges as you do. Continue to roll out until it is about 1 1/2 mm (1/16in) think and then stamp out circles using a 3 in cutter.
  • Keep any circles on a floured surface and covered with a damp tea towel or cut and fill them as you go.

Assembling the pierogi

  • To fill the pierogi, place a circle of dough in your left hand and position the stuffing ball in the middle. Use your right hand to create and indent in the centre of the stuffing so that it spreads out to the sides slightly.
  • Keep a wet cloth handy to wipe your hands and then pinch the dough around the filling to close. You can create a little pleated edge, if you like, by folding the dough along the edgeor you can score the edge with a fork.
  • Bring a large pot of water to the boil and add a 1 tsp salt. Boil the pierogi, in batches, about 8 at a time, for 2-3 minutes. Initially they will sink to the bottom of the pot but they will float to the top after a couple of minutes. You might need to give them a little stir to prevent them from sticking.
  • Lift out of the pot using a slotted spoon and place on a plate lined with kitchen towel. Repeat until you have cooked as many as you want.
  • Heat 1 tbsp butter and 1 tbsp of vegetable oil in a frying pan and pan fry the pierogi over medium heat for 1-2 minutes until golden.
  • Pan fry the bacon until crisp. Set aside to cool then cut into small pieces.
  • Fry the onion in the bacon fat until slightly caramelised and crispy.
  • Serve the pierogi with the fried onions and bacon (unless you are vegetarian of course) with a big dollop of sour cream on the side.

Notes

The dough will be enough for around 40-45 pierogi depending on how thinly you roll out the dough. If you wish to make both the mushroom and beef fillings you will need to double the amount of dough.
Put any leftover pierogi on a tray lined with greaseproof paper, making sure that they are not touching. Freeze until solid then transfer to a freezer bag.
To cook from frozen boil for 5-10 minutes, until they float to the top of the pot, then fry.